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”ECM challenges” for comms sector

by | Nov 24, 2008

Rich media has been identified as posing an enterprise content management (ECM) challenge to communications firmsThe communications sector is facing new enterprise content management (ECM) challenges due to the rise of rich-media files, reports Computer Business Review (CBR).

According to the publication, the proliferation of media in forms such as video is making it difficult for many firms to effectively archive their content.

Citing research from Datamonitor, CBR claims that a broad approach must be taken to putting in place ECM systems.

Without a widespread view, departmental systems may hold information which, were it pooled into a centralized resource, could offer commercial advantages.

For companies wishing to give multiple departments access to rich-media information, image conversion tools and a cross-format document viewer might be wise investments.

CBR adds that the need for ECM systems capable of handling rich-media content does not end at identifying potential areas to improve business operations.

Instead, the publication argues that complying with e-discovery legislation and managing more widespread operational risk are among the benefits.

Firms which do not keep pace with data growth "stand to become less cost effective and risk averse as more data are generated and accumulated over time", the article asserts.

A document viewer, coupled with image conversion capabilities, could seem the best way to ensure information is retrievable in any format.

EMC”s general manager of SharePoint technologies Andrew Chapman recently warned on the company”s Never Talk When You Can Nod blog that binary files such as rich-media documents should never be stored in databases designed to hold plain text or metadata.ADNFCR-1861-ID-18892420-ADNFCR